Tag: Google Analytics

The 10 most popular posts of the first half of 2012 are…

36,000 unique visitors* have stopped by this blog since the beginning of 2012. Nice.

What are you all looking at? Not what I would have thought.

Shipping containers

1. This is why teachers leave teaching.

Effectively just a commentary on Mark Clarkson’s stellar post. Almost 4,000 unique visitors to that one.

2. Announcing my new e-book: ‘The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies’ (#digilit)

Pleasing, but subscribers have tailed off since the initial flurry. Around 150 now signed up.

3. My TEDx talk on ‘The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies’

To be fair, Iwas expecting this to be popular, as TED-related stuff gets huge amounts of traction. Almost 2,500 people have now watched me pontificate about pictures of cats.

4. Journals, academia and the ivory tower.

I didn’t expect many people to want to engage with the open access journal debate but it seems that the post was timely.

5. Why I’m becoming a MoFo(er).

People seemed genuinely delighted when I announced I was joining the Mozilla Foundation. Which was nice.

6. How to create searchable notes from books using Evernote and your smartphone.

I thought this was obvious, but was asked to write it up. Perhaps it is obvious and people just came to check…

7. Web literacy? (v0.1)

It’s good to see that my work around web literac(ies) is popular – given that I’ll be splitting my time between working on it and evangelising Open Badges from now on!

8. Why the knowledge vs. skills debate in education is wrong-headed.

Wow! I only wrote this last week. I must have touched a nerve.

9. Digital literacy, digital natives, and the continuum of ambiguity (#openpeerreview)

I got many more comments than I expected with my Open Peer Review experiment. Amended article forthcoming.

10. You need us more than we need you.

This was the precursor to Journals, academia and the ivory tower (number 4 on the list)


Of course, posts I’ve written in previous years also remain popular. It would seem, for instance, that I should write more on procedural stuff around Google Apps (yawn!), explore further the links between leadership and emotional intelligence (possible!) and suggest yet more ways to make ‘textbook lessons’ more interesting (unlikely!)

Image CC BY-NC-SA Lightmash

*For some reason (probably user error) Google Analytics wasn’t tracking visits between April 10th and May 6th. So you can probably add another 6,000 to that number.

Surfacing stuff you may not have seen.

Every now and again I look at the Google Analytics profile of this blog. I’m usually pretty surprised by what I find.

Google Analytics

I write predominantly about education, technology and productivity. With a little bit of other random stuff thrown in. So guess which blog posts have been consistently in my top twenty most accessed?

These ones:

Notice that these were all written in 2008 or 2009, a time when I was first E-Learning Staff Tutor at at school in Doncaster, and then Director of E-Learning at an Academy in the North East.

So it turns out that people like practical, research-based stuff they can apply immediately. My inaugural reader survey told a similar story. Perhaps I need to re-focus my efforts. Which is difficult when I’m an office-based researcher…

Hello? Is it me you’re looking for?

Google Analytics got me singing Lionel Richie songs recently:

Hello, is it me you’re looking for?
‘Cause I wonder where you are
And I wonder what you do

It’s interesting what people are actually looking for when they stumble across this blog:

There are two opposite approaches to looking at this data:

  • Start writing more blog posts about these top 25 search terms
  • Ignore what people are searching for and concentrate on what interests you as the author

The third, more pragmatic response would be a mixture of these. Take those things that people are searching for that interest you and write more about them.

Which is what I plan to do. 🙂

P.S. Gotta love the fact that searching for ‘the most amazing thing on the internet’ brings you to my blog…

Blog post popularity as a treemap [infographic]

One of the best way to learn new things is through imitation.

  • Learning to play an instrument? Copy what your teacher does!
  • Learning to paint? Try painting in the style of a famous artist.
  • Learning to dance? Watch some videos on YouTube and attempt to replicate it in the comfort of your home.

That’s why, as I’m trying to become better at infographics, I really appreciate Nathan Yau’s guides over at FlowingData.com. Recently he had a great guide on how to create a ‘treemap’. I used slightly different variables (blog title, category, visitor time per post) and ended up with the following:

It was a fairly straightforward process:

  1. Export CSV from Google Analytics
  2. Select and tidy up data
  3. Fire up R and follow Nathan’s guide
  4. Tidy up in graphics program

***BONUS*** I knew this reminded me of something! Check out JDiskReport to visualize what’s on your hard drive in treemap format! 😀

A quick way to add a ‘sparkline’ to your blog.

See that little graph thing at the bottom of this blog? It’s called a sparkline and shows the number of visitor over the last month. Here’s how to add one to your own blog, courtesy of Google Analytics and a WordPress plugin!

The only slightly tricky bit is replacing:

http://www.google.com/xxxxxxxxxx

with

http://chart.apis.google.com/xxxxxxxxxx

It shows you how to do it here, but it over-complicates things and is slightly out-of-date.

If you want to brush up on your HTML, you could do worse than this guide! 😀

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