Tag: weblitstd

Mozilla needs your help with a final push for the Web Literacy Standard (beta)!

TL;DR: Mozilla is launching a new, open learning standard for Web Literacy. We need your help in finalising the skills involved and providing examples. You can jump in and help here: http://bit.ly/weblitstd-skills


I’ve been a bit quieter on this blog recently. There’s two reasons for that. The first is that I started a new, additional blog at http://literaci.es.

But there’s another reason: we’re reasonably close to a beta release for Mozilla’s new, open learning standard for Web Literacy.

By ‘we’ I mean the close to 50 people who have joined us at various points since February; they’ve helped Carla and me think through the many (and sometimes quite thorny) issues involved. The Mozilla Foundation is a non-profit, community-focused organisation: we need contributions from poeple like those who have volunteered their time and effort so far!

We’re aiming to launching the beta on July 26th. There’s a number of things that need to happen before then that are internal – things like graphic design, press releases and the like. But you can help, too! Here’s how.

Help us define skills

We’ve already got a competency grid (that’s in need of some Design TLC). Right now, though, we’re working on the skills underpinning those competencies. We also need at least a couple of examples of those skills.

You can dive in using the Google Docs and styleguide available from the link below. Please make sure you add/comment rather than delete!

http://bit.ly/weblitstd-skills

We’ve got a weekly community call every Monday that you’re very welcome to join. Further details of that can be found here.

Image CC BY marc faladeau

First draft of Mozilla’s Web Literacy standard now available!

I’m excited to announce that, after some fabulous work by my colleagues and the community, the first draft of Mozilla’s Web Literacy standard is now available:

http://mzl.la/weblitstd

We’ll be launching a ‘beta’ version in June which will be flesh out the competency-level grid and descriptors that make up this tentative first release.

The best way of thinking about the grid is as the areas that we think it’s important to pay attention to when teaching others how to read, write and participate on the Web.

I’d like to thank those who have been involved in this (ongoing) process and I’m very much looking forward to hearing further feedback, which you can give in several ways:

  1. In the comments below
  2. Using this feedback form
  3. On the weekly community calls

Please do feel share to share the URL at top of this post with your networks. It would be good to get as many eyes on this as possible. 🙂

Competency-level grid

Mozilla Web Literacy Standard - first draft

Competency descriptors

EXPLORING
Navigating the Web

  • Navigation – using software tools to browse the Web
  • Web Mechanics – understanding the Web ecosystem
  • Credibility – critically evaluating information found on the Web
  • Search – locating information, people and resources via the Web
  • Security – keeping systems, identities, and content safe

BUILDING
Creating for the Web

  • Composing for the Web – creating content (including text, images, audio and video) making use of Web technologies such as hyperlinks
  • Remixing – using existing (openly-licensed) content to create something new or modified
  • HTML – reading and writing HyperText Markup Language using the building blocks of the Web
  • CSS – reading, writing, testing and applying Cascading Style Sheets to change the visual appearance of HTML
  • Design & accessibility – creating universally effective communications through digital artifacts</li>
  • Coding/scripting – creating interactive experiences through digital artifacts for the Web
  • Infrastructure – understanding the Internet stack and how to host your own data

CONNECTING
Participating on the Web

  • Sharing & Collaborating – providing access to digital artifacts, understanding data ownership and jointly curating or creating content
  • Community participation – getting involved in Web communities, understanding and respecting online norms and practices
  • Privacy – working with intellectual property, examining and understanding the consequences of sharing data online
  • Open practices – championing, creating, and protecting the Web as a platform for democratic, universally accessible innovation

 

Latest version of Web Literacy standard grid (15th April 2013)

Update: For the latest information on the Web Literacy standard work, head to http://mzl.la/weblitstd


The grid below is one that I came up early on Saturday morning after conversations with my colleagues and after reflecting upon last week’s discussion.

Web Literacy standard grid (15th April 2013)

Changes:

  • Visual size of the elements (in attempt to show potential dependencies/conceptual ‘size’ of the competencies)
  • Added an iterated version of the community-created strand descriptors
  • Moved ‘Remixing’ to the Connecting strand as it seemed to fit better there
  • Changed ‘Coding/Scripting’ to ‘JavaScript’
  • Changed ‘Participating in Web Communities’ to ‘Community Participation’ to make it less wordy
  • Changed ‘Sharing via social networks’ to just ‘Sharing’ (to make it less specific)
  • Changed ‘Security/Encryption’ to just ‘Security’ and moved it to the Exploring strand to make it more distinct from ‘Privacy’
  • Merged ‘Web design’ with ‘Accessibiility’

Comments welcome! It would be great if you could make it to our weekly calls. 🙂

Weeknote 15/2013

This week I’ve been:

  • Creating two new grids for Mozilla’s Web Literacy standard work with the community. The first one’s here and the second (updated) one is still just on Flickr at the moment.
  • Planning my PELeCON keynote presentation. You have no idea how long it takes to collate, choose and organise animated GIFs.
  • Hosting the weekly Web Literacy standard community call. You can catch up here.
  • Catching up with people like Laura Hilliger, Tim RichesLucy Neale and StJohn Smith.
  • Editing the Wikipedia article for Open Badges. Only a bit, though. Must revisit.
  • Moderating a Connected Learning TV webinar featuring Liz Lawley and her work around a ‘gaming layer’ for students and academics.
  • Travelling to Plymouth by train, plane and automobile (literally) for PELeCON.
  • Attending, keynoting and running a workshop at PELeCON. The animated GIFs from my keynote aren’t so animated on Slideshare, so you may want to try this Evernote notebook. Photos are here (when they’ve finished uploading)

Next week I’m in Sweden keynoting and running a workshop at the Swedish equivalent of BETT. Better get planning…

Latest version of Web Literacy standard grid (8 April 2013)

Update: For the latest information on the Web Literacy standard work, head to http://mzl.la/weblitstd


Just a quick one to ensure the latest version of the Web Literacy standard competency grid is always here on my blog:

Web Literacy grid (8 April 2013)

Comments welcome! If we can agree on this then we need to get cracking with the descriptors for the strands and the competencies. 🙂

Our calls are now on Mondays at 8am PT / 11am ET / 4pm BST. All welcome! Details on the Mozilla wiki.

Weeknote 14/2013

This week I’ve been:

  • Spending time at home – a whole week without an event or a conference to go to!
  • Resting as Monday was a public holiday and I’d spent Friday and Saturday working.
  • Catching up with my colleague Laura Hilliger for the first time in a while.
  • Hosting an Open Badges in K12/schools community call featuring James Michie and Zoe Ross.
  • Feeding back on the Webmaker call about the workshop I ran at Nesta’s One Day Digital event in Edinburgh at the weekend.
  • Listening, reading and generally catching up with last week’s Web Literacy standard stuff. I wrote a modest proposal.
  • Writing a post about Open Badges and the Web Literacy standard which should hopefully appear on DMLcentral soon!
  • Turning down trips to Seville and Brussels because (unfortunately) they didn’t fit in well with my schedule.
  • Working out my expenses for March. <yawn>
  • Talking with my new colleague Mari Huertas.
  • Interviewed by Faiz Abdelhafid as part of his MA programme.
  • Conversing with organisations like the Open University and JobScout as well as people like Simon Gough and Guy Shearer about Open Badges in their particular context.
  • Writing a proposal with my colleague Emily Goligoski on Open Badges for the Libre Software Meeting.
  • Composing a blog post about how to align with the Web Literacy standard using Open Badges.
  • Planning a new ‘napkin sketch’ for the Web Literacy standard (like the Open Badges one) with my colleague Chris Appleton.
  • Hosting this week’s Web Literacy standard community call. Listen again here. Note we’re moving to Mondays from next week!
  • Collating a whole load of animated gifs kindly submitted by my MoFo colleagues for my PELeCON keynote. Have a look here!
  • Creating a NEW new grid for the Web Literacy standard based on community feedback.

Web Literacy Standard: a modest proposal (#weblitstd)

Update: For the latest information on the Web Literacy standard work, head to http://mzl.la/weblitstd


Over the last couple of months we at Mozilla have been hosting community calls in an attempt to come to a consensus around a new, open learning standard for Web Literacy. This is a contested area, for many of the reasons I point out in my yet-to-be-published paper on different types of ambiguity.

The reasons for us wanting to create a ‘standard’ for Web Literacy are outlined in this meta-post back in February. Since then we’ve had wide-ranging discussions, both on our weekly calls and on the Mozilla Webmaker list about what to include and, more recently, how to present the whole thing.

What I find fascinating is the importance of context when it comes to this work. This Web Literacy standard needs to to be flexible enough to apply to learners of all ages and stages and in contexts other than those with which we are most familiar. In short, it needs to be productively ambiguous. What do I mean by that? I mean it needs to be flexible enough to work in almost any context, yet be coherent enough to actually be worthwhile.

With that in mind, I want to present a ‘straw man’ which might serve us better than the previous grid:

Web Literacy Standard 'straw man'

Of course, the real fun comes when we get down to nailing down the competencies in each of the boxes. That’s this week’s call. 🙂

Do join us if you can for the weekly calls. The more eyes on this the better before we launch the draft version on April 26th!

 

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