Web Literacies: building on the work of Michelle Levesque

Web Literacy Skills map

On the surface, my main target for this year seems pretty straightforward: write a White Paper on Web Literacies that will be ready for the Mozilla Festival.

This White Paper needs to point to the Web Literacies that Mozilla think people require in order to be webmakers. And that’s where it gets interesting (and difficult). It can’t just be “Doug thinks…”

Thankfully, Michelle Levesque has done a lot of the spadework for me. Here’s a list of her blog posts, earliest first, that got her to this point (where I take over!)

So that’s 32 posts written by Michelle specifically about Web Literacies in eight months (others area about Open Badges and various events) . I’ve been toying with the idea of a separate blog for this but I think, on average, one post per week here on Web Literacies isn’t overkill – is it? 🙂

Image courtesy of Michelle Levesque

 

Web literacies? (v0.2 beta)

Web literacies? (v0.2 beta)

In the run-up to me starting full time with the Mozilla Foundation I’ve been continuing my thinking on web literacies.

The above diagram is based upon the excellent work of Michelle Levesque, my diagramming of her work, and some subsequent post-it notes.

I’m thinking out loud here.

Things that have changed since the last version:

  • Move from ‘web literacy’ to ‘web literacies’
  • Themes (exploring, connecting, building, protecting) organised hierarchically
  • Removal of ‘calling APIs’, ‘manipulating data’ and so on
  • Update: The colours no longer mean anything (thanks @PatParslow!)

I realise that the last of these could be contentious. The reason I’ve removed these more technical aspects has nothing to do with whether I think they’re important. Of course they are.

It’s just that if you start from the endpoint of describing someone who’s ‘web literate’ I think it’s entirely possible not to be able to ‘call an API’ yet still be web literate.

What do you think?

I’d really appreciate some feedback – this is still very early work! 🙂

 

Why I’m becoming a MoFo(er).

Mozilla logo

There’s something I’ve been bursting to tell people for the last few weeks. It’s something that will come as no surprise to some and a bit of a shock to others.

I’m joining the Mozilla Foundation.

I can’t tell you how excited I am! As ‘Badges and Skills Lead’ I’ll be both continuing the work started by Michelle Levesque on web literacies and evangelising Open Badges.

The last couple of years with JISC infoNet have been fantastic but I had to take such a wonderful opportunity! I’m fortunate to be both leaving and joining an extremely friendly, effective and forward-thinking team.

If you have any questions I’ll do my best to answer them in the comments below!

 

Reconfiguring Mozilla’s Web Literacies (v0.1 alpha)

Reconfiguring Mozilla's web literacies using post-its

Click image to enlarge!

I’ve been thinking about web literacy (or web literacies) on and off since I posted a diagram version of Michelle Levesque’s helpful first efforts.

The post-it note arrangement above is the result of a burst of creativity following a migraine earlier. The structure was prompted by some things mentioned by Helen Beetham at a couple of JISC events earlier this week.

I’d love some feedback!

 

[RECORDING] Connected Learning webinar on Open Badges

I was delighted to be asked to participate in a DML Central Connected Learning Google+ hangout about Open Badges yesterday. The recording should be embedded above, but if not try clicking here.

The session featured a presentation by Erin Knight, Senior Director of Learning at the Mozilla Foundation, and was facilitated by Howard Rheingold.

If you like this, you’ll also be interested in the webinar Erin and her colleague Michelle Levesque ran for the JISC Developing Digital Literacies programme last Friday. In that session, they discussed Mozilla’s work around web literacies.

Check that webinar out here, along with Erin’s write-up.

 

Web literacy? (v0.1)

Update: Michelle’s now created a diagram from her original post.


Michelle Levesque asked for feedback on this: Mozilla’s Web Literacy Skills (v0.1 alpha). I wanted to respond as soon as possible as I think she’s done some great work here.

I’ve visualised the text in her post and then tweaked it slightly to suggest the direction I’d take it:

Web literacy? (v0.1)

Click through for a larger version on Flickr.

Changes:

  • Added ‘participation’ to Exploring
  • Changed ‘bullshit’ to ‘crap’ to avoid offending some people’s sensibilities
  • Changed ‘Restaurant HTML’ to ‘HTML basics’ in Authoring
  • Combined two blocks to form ‘Reacting to stimulii’ in Building
  • Removed ‘Receipe’ize tasks’ in Building
  • Added ‘Civil liberties’ to Protecting
  • Segmented sections into what would form a ‘Basic’ and an ‘Advanced’ badge’

What do you think? What have I (we) missed?

(if you like this you may also be interested in The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies)

 
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