Tag: feedback

Reader survey: 2015 edition

Back in 2012, I created my first ‘annual reader survey’. You can see the results of that here. Despite my good intentions, I haven’t followed that up with a subsequent survey – until now!

Complete 2015 reader survey (4 mins)

As you’d expect, all questions are optional and all responses are anonymous. I’ll leave the survey open while I’m away during August and share back my findings on my return.

I’d really appreciate your participation – it will only take a few minutes of your precious time! I can only write for an audience I can define. 🙂

Image CC BY-NC-SA Ange

2012 blog reader survey: full breakdown

I’m pleased to announce that I was able to prioritise going through the inaugural blog reader survey that closed yesterday. Many thanks to those who took part; I’ve already announced the three winners of paperback copies of Best of Belshaw 2011.

The result of the analysis I carried out yesterday is a 34-page PDF document including graphs and anonymised feedback from the 137 readers who took part. You should be able to see it below (I recommend viewing fullscreen – click the arrows!)

If the above isn’t working for whatever reason, you can also get it at the Internet Archive.

Read the first complete draft of my doctoral thesis on digital literacies.

Update: I’ve now submitted my thesis and it’s available at neverendingthesis.com!

Doug's Ed.D. thesis

In 2006 George Siemens asked a bunch of people (including me) to proofread his book, Knowing Knowledge which he – innovatively for the time – released as a book, PDF and wiki. I happily did so and was credited along with many others who had been following George’s work in progress.

I know that many people reading this blog have followed my doctoral studies which has lasted about the same time as I’ve been blogging – six years. I’m delighted to say that yesterday I sent a complete draft of my Ed.D. thesis to my supervisor at Durham University. It may be a bit rough around the edges and there’ll be some inconsistencies, but it’s a huge relief to me.

Whilst my thesis – entitled What is digital literacy? A Pragmatic investigation – has been online since I started writing it in 2007, I thought I’d take this milestone as an opportunity to point people towards it and ask for some feedback. The major new update is Chapter 9 where I propose an ‘essential core’ of eight elements which make up an overlapping matrix of digital literacies.

I’ve had some great input and made connections with people all across the world during the last few years as a result of sharing my work. It’s a bit like pregnancy: the expectation during gestation is very different from the reality of delivering it. But now’s not a time to become coy and overly-protective about something I’ve been nurturing for so long; it’s time to, as with all my work, share it for the good of mankind. Ideas should be free.

And hopefully, just like a baby, people will admire and smile at it.

Feedback: why you read this blog.

A week ago I asked for some feedback, some reasons why you read this blog. The results were very interesting and the comments kind. 🙂

Feedback from blog survey

Some highlights from the Other category were ‘because I’m scared not to’, ‘satisfy idle curiosity’, ‘steal ideas’, and even ‘to snigger at your self-indulgent posts and share them with others’! :-p

Many people left wonderful feedback – thanks very much for that. I’m not going to share it all here, but this in particular made me smile:

“Are some edu bloggers more interested in exposure than impact?”
Its interesting that you comment on this because it is the exact reason why I like your blog so much, the fact that you want to help comes across very clearly in most of what you write and infact inspired me to start a blog, again more for myself but definitely not for recognition. I absolutely loved the piece on ‘cc’ and your attitude towards sharing good practice. Put quite simply www.dougbelshaw.com/blog is a place to read about good practice and it has definitely helped me.

This person (it was all anonymous so I don’t know who wrote this) has hit the nail on the head. I blog not only for myself as a creative outlet, but to:

  • Help and inspire others
  • Get people thinking
  • Share good practice

Thanks for all your comments in 2009 and I look forward to continuing the conversation in 2010! 😀

Why do you read this blog?


CC BY-SA Karl Horton

I write this blog mainly for me. Selfish as it may sound, I actually need an outlet for my thoughts and ideas.

That being said, I am interested in what people think of what I write and believe it is important to get feedback. As a consequence, I’d be grateful whether it’s your first or thousandth time visiting this blog, in you clicking some buttons below! 🙂

If you’re reading this via an RSS reader or via email and don’t see a Google form embedded above, you might want to click through!

How to SPIN your way to giving more constructive negative feedback.

Spin

Image by jaqian @ Flickr

It’s difficult to give feedback, especially when it’s not positive. However, as a leader, it’s something that’s necessary to get the best of people. I know I keep banging on about Jo Owen’s book How to Lead: what you actually need to do to manage, lead and succeed but it’s excellent. Concise wisdom is what it is. 🙂

Owen believes that using the acronym SPIN can help leaders give more constructive feedback:

  • Situation specifics
  • Personal impact
  • Insight & interpretation
  • Next steps

Situation specifics

First of all, make sure the time and place is right. Give negative feedback in private when the person to whom you are giving it is calm. This needs to be as close to the event as possible (‘feedback, like milk, goes off fairly quickly’) but not when they are shouting and screaming!

Be specific about what happened. Using terms such as ‘unprofessional’ is not helpful and can actually be provocative. Talk about what it is in particular that is the problem (e.g. lateness to meetings).

Personal impact

People can argue about objective matters but not about how things make you feel. For example, saying that arriving late for meetings makes you think they don’t consider them to be important cannot be argued against.

Going down the ‘personal impact’ path allows you to talk about the issue without arguing, for example, about the number of minutes late, number of times, etc. Deal with the issue and

Insight & interpretation

Instead of telling people what to do, ask them if the impact that they’ve made (i.e. upsetting you) was the impact they wished to make. Get them to reflect on their actions. They are much more likely to value the solutions they come up with above any solution that you hand them.

Next steps

Once you’ve been through the above steps, you should now be able to calmly agree ‘next steps’ between you. Focus on the future being positive and constructive. Don’t play the ‘blame game’ and avoid discussing the past at this point.

Conclusion

Owen advises taking time over each step and not rushing through them. Although no-one looks forward to giving negative feedback, I am happier now that I’ve got a constructive way of approaching it!

What are your thoughts? 😀

Skribit: Suggest topics for me to blog about

SkribitEagle-eyed visitors to this blog may have noticed that I’ve added a widget from Skribit in the sidebar. What is it? :p

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