Tag: DMLcentral (page 2 of 4)

Curate or Be Curated: Why Our Information Environment is Crucial to a Flourishing Democracy, Civil Society [DMLcentral]

Curate or Be Curated: Why Our Information Environment is Crucial to a Flourishing Democracy, Civil Society | DMLcentral 2014-10-24 08-02-37

My latest post for DMLcentral is up. Entitled Curate or Be Curated: Why Our Information Environment is Crucial to a Flourishing Democracy, Civil Society it’s a slightly longer post than usual. My aim is to get educators to think about their own information environment and that which they’re promoting to their students:

The problem with social networks as news platforms is that they are not neutral spaces. Perhaps the easiest way to get quickly to the nub of the issue is to ask how they are funded. The answer is clear and unequivocal: through advertising. The two biggest social networks, Twitter and Facebook (which also owns Instagram and WhatsApp), are effectively “services with shareholders.” Your interactions with other people, with media, and with adverts, are what provide shareholder value. Lest we forget, CEOs of publicly-listed companies have a legal obligation to provide shareholder value. In an advertising-fueled online world this means continually increasing the number of eyeballs looking at (and fingers clicking on) content.

Click here to read the post.

I’ve closed comments here to encourage you to leave them on the original post. I look forward to your feedback!

PS You might also be interested in Ian O’Byrne’s response to the post.

Scaffolding Web Literacy Through Learning Pathways [DMLcentral]

Scaffolding Web Literacy Through Learning Pathways

My latest post for DMLcentral is up. Entitled Scaffolding Web Literacy Through Learning Pathways, I discuss the difference between training and learning, as well as ways in which we can scaffold the development of web literacy.

Read the post here

I’ve closed comments here to encourage you to comment over there. It’s a great encouragement to hear your thoughts – however brief! 🙂

Reclaiming the Web for the Next Generation [DMLcentral]

Reclaiming the Web for the Next Generation

My 20th post for DMLcentral has now published. Entitled Reclaiming the Web for the Next Generation, my aim was to point out a fundamental problem with the way we ‘pay’ for our technology (i.e. through user data) and how that applies to education.

I’d love your comments on it – I’ve closed them here so you can do so over there!

Click here to read the post

 

Why I still believe in badges [DMLcentral]

My latest post for DMLcentral is up. Entitled Why I still believe in badges, it’s a response to a comment by a Philosophy professor (who will remain anonymous) that Open Badges are merely a way that for-profit companies can get a slice of the action in Higher Education.

A quotation from the article:

While badges could, potentially, be used for nefarious purposes, it’s my belief that the open, distributed architecture of the code and community means that we can seek to improve our education both inside and outside the walls of institutions. This is not about ‘disrupting’ education for the sake of it or for private profit. This is about providing another way of doing things to promote human flourishing.

You can read the whole thing at DMLcentral. Please do comment over there (I’ve closed comments here).

Re-imagining the Where, When, and How of Educational Practice [DMLcentral]

My latest post for DMLcentral is up. Entitled Re-imagining the Where, When, and How of Educational Practice, it’s an attempt to cover briefly three topics:

  1. The role of money in education
  2. ‘Disruptive’ innovation
  3. The DML conference 2014

I think my favourite paragraph is this one:

The priority here in education, formal or informal, should be upon facilitating learning, not finding ways to use the latest technology that comes along. While there’s an undoubted thrill in, for example, finding ways to use something like Google Glass, we as educators shouldn’t feel pressure to do so merely because it exists. We should focus on creating learning environments that integrate technology use, not throw the baby out with the bathwater in the name of ‘disruption.’ Education isn’t broken, it’s just being systematically defunded in order to let private providers ‘save the day.’

I’d really appreciate your comments – whether you agree with what I’ve got to say or not. I’ve closed them here to encourage you to comment on the original post.

Image CC BY The Knowles Gallery

The Ontology of the Web (Or, Why I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Learning Standards) [DMLcentral]

My latest post for DMLcentral is now up.

Entitled The Ontology of the Web (Or, Why I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Learning Standards), I manage to cram in references to Clay Shirky, William James, Plato, and John Dewey into just over a thousand words.

At the beginning of 2013 the Mozilla Foundation announced its intention to work with the community to create a new learning standard for Web Literacy. I’m delighted to say that we’re well on course to release v1.0 of that standard at the Mozilla Festival in London at the end of October. In this post I want to give an overview of how I went from being initially skeptical to an enthusiastic project lead – all because of something I learned about ontology from Clay Shirky.

You can read the post in full here.

Privacy, the NSA and Web Literacies [DMLcentral]

My latest post for DMLcentral is now up. Entitled Privacy, the NSA and Web Literacies I focus on what we can actually do in the wake of the NSA surveillance revelations. And no, I didn’t choose the accompanying photo. 😉

Read it here: http://dmlcentral.net/blog/doug-belshaw/privacy-nsa-and-web-literacies

(in other news, you might like prism-break.org and Mozilla’s work around the Web Literacy Standard)

Weeknote 24/2013

This week I’ve been:

  • Presenting and running workshops on Open Badges at a CRA seminar (Monday, Birmingham).
  • Meeting lots of people/organisations at the Mozilla London office to explore ways they can use badges. People like Creative Skillset, OCR, Livity and Inspir.ed.
  • Booking travel for the coming weeks.
  • Running a webinar on Open Badges for Learning Pool (slides here)
  • Ordering more business cards. The other ones didn’t turn up and, as 20th-century as they feel, I’m often in a position where I need to give them out.
  • Catching up with the audio from the Web Literacy Standard community call, hosted by Carla.
  • Hosting the Open Badges community call for the first time for a while.
  • Talking some more and reaching out to various people within Mozilla about Firecloud.
  • Writing a post for DMLcentral about the NSA, Mozilla and privacy that I hope will go live on Monday.
  • Claiming back expenses for speaking at recent events.
  • Meeting with my newest colleague Meg Cole via Skype.
  • Getting some training on interviews with the media from Erica Sackin.
  • Participating in a great day of networking, sharing and planning for a new city-wide learning co-operative (potentially powered by badges!) hosted by the University of Salford.

This week I’ve done loads of stuff myself, but my colleagues have been even busier. This week Mozilla has, well done pretty much everything:

Next week I’m presenting at the Learning and Skills Group (London, Tuesday) and moderating a session on ‘Digital Skills for Work and Learning’ at the EC Digital Agenda Assembly 2013 (Dublin, Wednesday). I’m also looking forward to working with the Mozilla comms team on next month’s beta release of the Web Literacy Standard.

Why we need a learning standard for Web Literacy [DMLcentral]

Update: For the latest information on the Web Literacy standard work, head to http://mzl.la/weblitstd


I’m pleased that my latest post for DMLcentral is up. Entitled Why We Need a Learning Standard for Web Literacy I examine how we can best structure ways in which people learn to not only read but write the Web:

When it comes to getting better at using and making the Web the current status quo is problematic for learners. Where do you go if you want to get better at your Web skills? How do you even know what’s important to learn? I would suggest that most of us who count ourselves as ‘Web Literate’ reached that level more by luck than by judgement. I certainly enjoyed the journey, but it’s been an extremely long and meandering path. I think we can do better for learners.

If you’re a regular reader of this blog it’s effectively a repackaged version of what I’ve been banging on about here. Please do add your thoughts on the DMLcentral post – I’ve closed comments here to encourage you to comment over there. 🙂

PS Don’t forget to attend this Thursday’s Web Literacy standard online gathering!

Some Thoughts on Interest-based Pathways to Learning. [DMLcentral]

I’ve been waiting a while to have this published so I’m really glad that my latest article for DMLcentral is now up. Entitled Some Thoughts on Interest-based Pathways to Learning I look at ways in which learning can be driven by interests rather than compulsion – at least for informal education. It’s definitely linked to my last post about online peer assessment.

Please do leave comments over at DMLcentral. I’ve closed comments here to encourage you to do just that!

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