Tag: DML Conference

Profit: the purpose of education? [GETideas.org]

I had the good fortune to bump into Lucy Gray at the DML Conference in Chicago back in March. She asked if I’d write something for GETideas.org, “the community for education leaders”. Slightly belatedly I’ve duly obliged and the post below is now published on the site.

I believe education to be public good, as something that profits the children’s mind, body and soul – not as something that should lead to financial profit for large corporates. I want teachers to do things in the classroom with an eye on my children’s learning and development, not on making sure they can pass a performance review in order to meet their mortgage payments.

Schools can, and probably should, be run in line with some business principles. But allowing schools to ‘go to the wall’ (as has been suggested in some quarters) because of the vagaries of the market sounds horrendous. Schools are places where human interactions should take place, not financial transactions.

Read the post in full here: Profit: the purpose of education?

Many thanks to Lucy for the invitation to contribute! 🙂

Weeknote 12/2013

This week I’ve been:

  • Delayed coming back from the DML Conference in Chicago (my write-up of the conference is here). My flight was cancelled due to the First Officer being ‘sick’ on St. Patrick’s Day. 😉 My subsequent flight was delayed meaning I didn’t get home until Tuesday lunchtime!
  • Taking a day off to spend with my family.
  • Working with Matt Thompson on a diagram to explain what Mozilla’s Web Literacy standard is for. It still needs some work before sharing more widely!
  • Summarising the previous week’s Web Literacy standard work.
  • Booking travel to OER13 and the PELeCON conference, both of which I’m keynoting. Also booked flights to the Mozilla All-Hands meeting in Toronto in May.
  • Planning out my OER13 keynote in Evernote. I’ll be talking about ambiguity, Open Badges and Web Literacy.
  • Talking to people who may want to align with the draft version of the Web Literacy standard being launched on April 26th.
  • Continuing to talk to people/organisations about Open Badges.
  • Writing an abstract for the PLE conference (with Tim Riches) and sending Brian Kelly a title and abstract for IWMW13.
  • Helping interview a potential new hire to our team.
  • Getting things sorted for Nesta’s One Day Digital event in Edinburgh next Saturday. I’m running a workshop on Mozilla’s Popcorn Maker and taking my family up for Friday/Saturday.

Next week I’ll be returning to the place of my birth (Nottingham) for the OER13 conference (Tuesday/Wednesday), continuing to work on the Web Literacy standard stuff and travelling up to Edinburgh on Good Friday with my family for the Nesta event mentioned above.

Open Badges reaches v1.0!

TL;DR version: Mozilla’s launching v1.0 of the Open Badges Infrastructure at the DML Conference 2013 today. There’s a newly designed website and badge backpack.


I’m at the DML Conference 2013 this week where, I’m delighted to say, Mozilla is launching version 1.0 of the Open Badges Infrastructure (OBI). Given how long I’ve been banging on about badges this may seem surprising, but it just goes to show the extent to which Mozilla works in the open with the community!

You should check out the newly-redesigned website and badge backpack (note new URL for latter now it’s out of beta!)

I don’t usually do this, but I believe the text below put together by our new Communications Director Erica Sackin  puts things way better than I could:

Open Badges is a new online standard to recognize and verify learning. A digital badge is an online representation of a skill you’ve earned. Open Badges take that concept one step further, and allow you to verify your skills, interests and achievements through a credible organization. And because the system is based on an open standard, you can combine multiple badges from different issuers to tell the complete story of your achievements — both online and off. Display your badges wherever you want them on the web, and share them for employment, education or lifelong learning.

Ten things to know about Open Badges:

  1. Mozilla Open Badges is not proprietary — it’s free software and an open technical standard. That means any organization can create, issue and verify digital badges, and any user can earn, manage and display these badges all across the web.
  2. Open Badges knits your skills together. Whether they’re issued by one organization or many, badges can build upon each other, joining together to tell the full story of your skills and achievement.
  3. With Open Badges, every badge is full of information. Each one has important data built in that links back to the issuer, the criteria it was issued under and evidence verifying the credential — a feature unique to Open Badges.
  4. Open Badges lets you take your badges everywhere. Users have an easy and comprehensive way to collect their badges in a backpack, and display their skills and achievements on social networking profiles, job sites, their websites and more.
  5. Individuals can earn badges from multiple sources, both online and offline, and manage and share them using the Open Badges backpack. Today, we’re launching with the Mozilla backpack — other organizations will be able to use Open Badges to make their own backpacks later this year.
  6. Open Badges make it easy to get recognition for the things you learn, both online and off. Open Badges includes a shared standard for recognizing your skills and achievements — and lets you count them towards an education, a job or lifelong learning.
  7. Open Badges make it easy to give recognition for the things you teach. Anyone who meets the standards can award badges for skills or learning.
  8. Open Badges make it easy to display your verified badges across the web. Earn badges from anywhere, then share them wherever you want—on social networking profiles, job sites or on your website.
  9. Open Badges make it easy to verify skills. Employers, organizations and schools can explore the data behind every badge issued using Mozilla Open Badges to verify individuals’ skills and competencies.
  10. Open Badges is free, open to anyone to use and part of Mozilla’s non-profit mission. Open Badges is designed, built and backed by a broad community of contributors, such as NASA, Smithsonian, Intel, the Girl Scouts, and more. The open source model means that improvements made by one partner can benefit everyone, from bug fixes to new features.

Do feel free to ask me any questions in the comments below!

 

Weeknote 10/2013

This week I’ve been:

  • Attending SXSWedu all week in Austin, Texas. I’ve blogged about that here.
  • Presenting at SXSWedu. Slides for the session Kathleen Stokes and I ran on ‘Supporting a Generation of Digital Makers’ can be found on Slideshare.
  • Co-ordinating the work around Mozilla’s work with the community around a new, open learning standard for Web Literacy. You can find the recording from this week’s call here.

Next week I’m working from home on Monday and Tuesday and then heading to Chicago on Wednesday for the DML Conference. Excitingly, we’ll be launching v1.0 of the Open Badges Infrastructure! Also, as I’m not speaking there I’m looking forward to the  snow subsiding and the green river for St. Patrick’s Day!

Weeknote 08/2013

This week I’ve been:

  • Taking PTO (Paid Time Off or ‘holiday’ as we call it over here). I took Monday off work as it was the first day of the half-term holidays. We went to Belsay.
  • Writing the first draft of a vision document for Mozilla’s Web Literacy standard work.
  • Leading an #etmooc session. I blogged about T3S1: Digital Literacies with Dr. Doug Belshaw (#etmooc) and linked to the recording.
  • Responding to comments on my DMLcentral blog post Why We Need a Learning Standard for Web Literacy
  • Advising how to make your blog posts last forever in the wake of Posterous announcing it’s closing down.
  • Planning more activity around the Web Literacy standard work I’m leading for Mozilla
  • Celebrating being granted planning permission for the ‘shoffice’ we’re going to build at the bottom of the garden.
  • Travelling to London for a couple of days’ work (Thursday/Friday).
  • Speaking at the University of West London about Open Badges. The lecture theatre was packed (standing-room only!) with over 90% students. Slides here.
  • Contributing to the repeated Web Literacy standard kick-off online gathering. You can access the recording via the Mozilla wiki page.
  • Posting to the Mozilla Webmaker Google Group.
  • Planning a presentation and creating a video for the SXSWedu session that Kate Stokes (Nesta) and I are running.
  • Booking flights for the next Mozilla All Hands in Toronto (week beginning 20th May)

Next week it’s nose to the grindstone. I’m at home all week spending a couple of days helping judge the Mozilla Game On competition and planning the start of the Web Literacy standard weekly calls. However, as I’m at SXSWedu (Austin, Texas) and then the DML Conference (Chicago) with only a few days inbetween, I need to get planning! Not only do I need to have the whole ‘arc’ in place for the Web Literacy standard work before DML, I also need to start getting ready for my OER13 keynote and the Nesta One Day Digital (Edinburgh) session that are coming up before the end of March. 🙂

Weeknote 06/2013

This week I have been mostly:

  • Reading Mindstorms by Seymour Papert.
  • Planning a SXSWedu panel session with Kate Stokes from Nesta.
  • Writing lots of blog posts explaining Mozilla’s (or at least my) thinking around a new, open learning standard for Web Literacy. See this overview post pulling everything together.
  • Preparing for and presenting as part of the kick-off online gathering for the Web Literacy standard. related resources are here.
  • Leading a Vital TeachShare session on Mozilla Webmaker tools. Slides here and the recording (which I’m hoping to have converted into a more Web-friendly format) can be found here.
  • Talking to the University of Hull about Open Badges for skills awards. I’m also in conversations with another university about a badge-based BSc, which is exciting. And the BBC. Badges, badges everywhere!
  • Submitting an IGNITE proposal for the DML Conference 2013 around the Web Literacy standard work. I did one last year (on a different topic) so I’m not sure if that counts for or against me.

Next week I’m a guest of the University of Salford who are interested in exploring Open Badges for various things. And, apart from eating pancakes on Tuesday and being extra-nice to my wife on Thursday, I’m looking forward to catching up with longer-term projects like learning JavaScript. 🙂

Weeknote 05/2013

This week I’ve been:

  • More unproductive than usual, overall. Despite what’s below, I feel I should have achieved more this week. I’d like to attribute this to external factors such as jetlag knocking out my schedule but, to be honest, I should know better. Not enough exercise, too many late nights, and eating the wrong foods at the wrong times of the day. It all adds up.
  • Working on preparation for upcoming work around defining a new, open learning standard for Web Literacy. This has taken up a fair amount of my time writing copy, checking links and sorting out workflows. Whenever something looks simple and straightforward, it’s usually because someone has taken time over it beforehand.
  • Writing about online peer assessment building on interest-based pathways to learning.
  • Spending time on Quora. I really like the new blog feature. The whole experience gets a bit addictive – it’s a fairly compelling package now.
  • Talking with organizations about Open Badges. I’m never sure whether for-profit organisations are happy to tell the world they’re thinking about using badges (I should probably ask), but needless to say there’s plenty of interest from well-known ones!
  • Spending time with my family after being away most of last week (including the weekend!)
  • Registering for the DML Conference 2013. Not only is Mozilla launching v1.0 of the Open Badges Infrastructure (OBI) there, but it’s a great chance to catch up with people I usually only interact with online.
  • Marking some bids for the Nesta/Nominet Trust/Mozilla Digital Makers call.
  • Starting to brainstorm ideas for my OER13 keynote.
  • Replying to questions in the Open Badges Google Group
  • Sorting out Asana, a web app we use to co-ordinate team efforts within Mozilla. I get it now.
  • Changing my avatar everywhere as I’ve started wearing a hat. This may or may not be related to #LettingGrow.

Next week I’m looking forward to planning (with Kate Stokes from Nesta) our SXSWedu panel, figuring out more stuff around online peer assessment, and kicking-off Mozilla’s collaboration with the community around a new, open standard for Web Literacy.

The story behind 3 presentations: #cetis12, #dml2012 and #TEDxWarwick

Update: slides and audio for #cetis12 presentation now available!

Doug Belshaw presenting at PELC11

Apologies for the relative drought here over the past couple of weeks. I’ve been working hard on some presentations that I think you’ll want to see.

You know what? I’ve been at JISC infoNet almost two years now but something I’m still getting to grips with is the different peaks and the troughs over the academic year. They’re just not the same in Higher Education as they are in schools. For a start, some of them are my own choice.

This past few weeks have definitely been a peak for me, one that will last until mid-March. All of my writing energy recently has been going into preparing three talks I’ve got coming up:

  1. Are Open Badges the future for recognition of skills? (JISC CETIS conference, Nottingham, 23 February 2012)
  2. Why we need a debate about the purpose(s) of education (DML Conference, San Francisco, 1 March 2012)
  3. The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies (TEDx Warwick, Coventry, 10 March 2012)

So, three different topics in three very different formats. The Open Badges talk tomorrow is part of a wider session and will be fairly relaxed and informal. The Purpos/ed one is an Ignite talk where I get 5 minutes (exactly!) to talk about my subject. I’ve got 20 slides and they’re advanced automatically every 20 seconds. Eek!

Finally, and the one I’m most excited about giving, is my TEDx Warwick talk. I’ve been using and adapting the advice in Nancy Duarte’s books Resonate and Slide:ology to help get my message across. I haven’t quite finished this one yet (and I’d better get a move on because they want my slides two weeks in advance!)

I hope you understand, therefore, why updates here might be quite light until March 11th. I’ve posted a couple of quick things over at literaci.es over the past week and I’ll make sure I update my conference blog. Other than that, why not get involved in the OpenBeta process for my new ebook, if you haven’t already? And, if you can, why not join me at TEDx Warwick?

Image CC BY-NC-SA foto_mania

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